A Reply Sent to an Erring Customer: Questions

A Reply Sent to an Erring Customer Dear Sir, Your letter of the 23rd, with a cheque for Rs. 25,000/- on account, is to hand. We note what you say as to the difficulty you experience in collecting your outstanding accounts, but we are compelled to remark that we do not think you are treating us with the consideration we have a right to expect. It is true that small remittances have been forwarded from time to time, but the debit balance against you has been steadily increasing during the past twelve months until it now stands at the considerable total of Rs. 5,000/- Having regard to the many years during which you have been a customer of this house and the, generally speaking, satisfactory character of your account, we are reluctant to resort to harsh measures. We must, however, insist that the existing balance should be cleared off by regular installments of say Rs. 10,000/- per month, the first installment to reach us by the 7th. In the meantime you shall pay cash for all further goods; we are allowing you an extra 3% discount in lieu of credit.

We shall be glad to hear from you about this arrangement, as otherwise we shall have no alternative but definitely to close your account and place the matter in other hands. Yours truly, Questions: 1. Comment on the appropriateness of the sender’s tone to a customer. Answer: The letter should have begin with a paragraph that brings out the general situation (conditions) as a context in which the reader’s request was considered and also indicated in a neutral or friendly tone the reasons that would lead to a negative information/refusal.

In this situation the sender’s tone is rude and harsh, should have avoided. The sender could not convey message in a tone assuring the reader that the negative message decision is arrived at after a careful and thorough consideration of the total situation and facts that cannot be altered by the sender or the decision maker. Sender did not meet the basic purpose of the indirect pattern is to ensure that the reader is left convinced that the refusal is not based on arbitrary, subjective or personal reasons. Business letters in all situations should be written with politeness and respect for each other.

A negative response letter in a business situation is bound to create unpleasant feelings of disappointment in the reader. Our purpose is to write about the NO information while producing the minimum disappointment. 2. Point out the old – fashioned phrases and expressions. Answer: Please find below the old fashioned phrases and expressions used in the reply. – …with a cheque for Rs. 25,000/- on account, is to hand. – We note what you say as to the difficulty… – …but we are compelled to remark that we do not think you are treating us with the consideration we have a right to expect. Having regard to the many years during which you… – …shall pay cash for all further goods. – … as otherwise we shall have no alternative but definitely to close your account and place the matter in other hands. 3. Rewrite the reply according to the principles of effective writing in business. Answer: Dear Mr/Ms. _____, This is with reference to your letter dated 23rd along with cheque for Rs. 25,000/-. Your difficulty in collecting the outstanding payments from your customers is considered with great understanding and care.

We acknowledge your remittances received time to time, at present the increased debit balance in last twelve months stands at the considerable total amount of Rs 85,000/-. Keeping in mind the satisfied long relationship with you, to clear the existing balance we would like to offer you a regular installment payment of Rs. 10,000/- per month to reach us by the 7th. Meantime you can avail the goods by paying cash with an extra 3% discount in lieu of credit. We appreciate your cooperation and expecting an early positive reply to avoid any unwanted situations. Sincerely, __________________